books

Kindle Deals on Good Books {March. 28, 2018 Edition}

It's like following a treasure map -- you find one great Kindle book on sale, and soon you're following the trail to a dozen more delicious books on sale for just a few dollars (or less!). Instead of just hoarding all these discounted Kindle books for myself -- which, I assure you, I still am doing -- I thought I'd also share my findings. Here are my discoveries, current as of March 28, 2018.

The Paper Magician Series by Charlie N. Holmberg

Ceony Twill arrives at the cottage of Magician Emery Thane with a broken heart. Having graduated at the top of her class from the Tagis Praff School for the Magically Inclined, Ceony is assigned an apprenticeship in paper magic despite her dreams of bespelling metal. And once she’s bonded to paper, that will be her only magic…forever.

Yet the spells Ceony learns under the strange yet kind Thane turn out to be more marvelous than she could have ever imagined—animating paper creatures, bringing stories to life via ghostly images, even reading fortunes. But as she discovers these wonders, Ceony also learns of the extraordinary dangers of forbidden magic.

An Excisioner—a practitioner of dark, flesh magic—invades the cottage and rips Thane’s heart from his chest. To save her teacher’s life, Ceony must face the evil magician and embark on an unbelievable adventure that will take her into the chambers of Thane’s still-beating heart—and reveal the very soul of the man.

From the imaginative mind of debut author Charlie N. Holmberg, The Paper Magician is an extraordinary adventure both dark and whimsical that will delight readers of all ages. Grab your copy here.

This is Just My Face by Gabourey Sidibe

Gabourey Sidibe—“Gabby” to her legion of fans—skyrocketed to international fame in 2009 when she played the leading role in Lee Daniels’s acclaimed movie Precious. In This Is Just My Face, she shares a one-of-a-kind life story in a voice as fresh and challenging as many of the unique characters she’s played onscreen. With full-throttle honesty, Sidibe paints her Bed-Stuy/Harlem family life with a polygamous father and a gifted mother who supports her two children by singing in the subway. Sidibe tells the engrossing, inspiring story of her first job as a phone sex “talker.” And she shares her unconventional (of course!) rise to fame as a movie star, alongside “a superstar cast of rich people who lived in mansions and had their own private islands and amazing careers while I lived in my mom's apartment.” 
 
Sidibe’s memoir hits hard with self-knowing dispatches on friendship, depression, celebrity, haters, fashion, race, and weight (“If I could just get the world to see me the way I see myself,” she writes, “would my body still be a thing you walked away thinking about?”). Irreverent, hilarious, and untraditional, This Is Just My Face will resonate with anyone who has ever felt different, and with anyone who has ever felt inspired to make a dream come true. Grab your copy here.

The Restaurant Critic's Wife by Elizabeth LaBan

Lila Soto has a master’s degree that’s gathering dust, a work-obsessed husband, two kids, and lots of questions about how exactly she ended up here.

In their new city of Philadelphia, Lila’s husband, Sam, takes his job as a restaurant critic a little too seriously. To protect his professional credibility, he’s determined to remain anonymous. Soon his preoccupation with anonymity takes over their lives as he tries to limit the family’s contact with anyone who might have ties to the foodie world. Meanwhile, Lila craves adult conversation and some relief from the constraints of her homemaker role. With her patience wearing thin, she begins to question everything: her decision to get pregnant again, her break from her career, her marriage—even if leaving her ex-boyfriend was the right thing to do. As Sam becomes more and more fixated on keeping his identity secret, Lila begins to wonder if her own identity has completely disappeared—and what it will take to get it back. Grab your copy here.

The Designer by Marius Gabriel

1944, newly married Copper Reilly arrives in Paris soon after the liberation. While the city celebrates its freedom, she’s stuck in the prison of an unhappy marriage. When her husband commits one betrayal too many, Copper demands a separation.

Alone in Paris, she finds an unlikely new friend: an obscure, middle-aged designer from the back rooms of a decaying fashion house whose timid nature and reluctance for fame clash with the bold brilliance of his designs. His name is Christian Dior.

Realising his genius, Copper urges Dior to strike out on his own, helping to pull him away from his insecurities and towards stardom. With just a camera and a typewriter, she takes her own advice and ventures into the wild and colourful world of fashion journalism.

Soon Copper finds herself torn between two very different suitors, questioning who she is and what she truly wants. As the city rebuilds and opulence returns, can Copper make a new, love-filled life for herself? Grab your copy here.

Moriarty by Anthony Horowitz

The game is once again afoot in this thrilling mystery from the bestselling author of The House of Silk, sanctioned by the Conan Doyle estate, which explores what really happened when Sherlock Holmes and his arch nemesis Professor Moriarty tumbled to their doom at the Reichenbach Falls.

Internationally bestselling author Anthony Horowitz’s nail-biting new novel plunges us back into the dark and complex world of detective Sherlock Holmes and Moriarty—dubbed the Napoleon of crime” by Holmes—in the aftermath of their fateful struggle at the Reichenbach Falls.

Days after the encounter at the Swiss waterfall, Pinkerton detective agent Frederick Chase arrives in Europe from New York. Moriarty’s death has left an immediate, poisonous vacuum in the criminal underworld, and there is no shortage of candidates to take his place—including one particularly fiendish criminal mastermind.

Chase and Scotland Yard Inspector Athelney Jones, a devoted student of Holmes’s methods of investigation and deduction originally introduced by Conan Doyle in “The Sign of Four”, must forge a path through the darkest corners of England’s capital—from the elegant squares of Mayfair to the shadowy wharfs and alleyways of the London Docks—in pursuit of this sinister figure, a man much feared but seldom seen, who is determined to stake his claim as Moriarty’s successor.

A riveting, deeply atmospheric tale of murder and menace from one of the only writers to earn the seal of approval from Conan Doyle’s estate, Moriarty breathes life into Holmes’s dark and fascinating world. Grab your copy here.

You've Got 8 Seconds by Paul Hellman

Every day at work, people do three things: talk, listen, and pretend to listen. That’s not surprising—the average attention span has dropped to 8 seconds. To get heard, says high-stakes communications expert Paul Hellman, you need to focus your message, be slightly different, and deliver with finesse.

Through fast, fun, actionable tips, You’ve Got 8 Seconds explains what works and what doesn’t, what’s forgettable and what sticks. With stories, scripts, and examples of good and bad messages, the book reveals three main strategies.

You’ll discover practical techniques, including the Fast-Focus Method™ that the author uses with leadership teams; how to stand out in the first seconds of a presentation; and 10 actions that spell executive presence.

Whether pitching a project, giving a speech, selling a product, or just writing your next email, with You’ve Got 8 Seconds you’ll get heard, get remembered, and get results. Grab your copy here.


That's all I've got for now. Watch the blog for another list next week.

What great Kindle deals have you seen on good books? Share in the comments!

Kindle Deals on Good Books {Jan. 9, 2017 Edition}

It's like following a treasure map -- you find one great Kindle book on sale, and soon you're following the trail to a dozen more delicious books on sale for just a few dollars (or less!). Instead of just hoarding all these discounted Kindle books for myself -- which, I assure you, I still am doing -- I thought I'd also share my findings. Here are my discoveries, current as of January 9, 2017.

Trigger Warning by Neil Gaiman

It's really hard for me to pick a favorite author. But if I really, really, reallllllyyyyyy had to, it would be Neil Gaiman, hands down. His Neverwhere is my favorite fiction book of all time, and I aspire to create words and worlds of the caliber that he does. So it was a delightful surprise to find his latest collection of short fiction on sale for Kindle for just $1.99. Didn't have to think twice about that one! Get Trigger Warning here.

Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson

Bill Bryson's creative non-fiction slays me. It truly does. I never would have expected that when I first read his memoir of walking the Appalachian Trail, A Walk in the Woods, back in college, but he is hilarious. As in: laugh out loud in the middle of a coffee shop while snorting frappucino out your nose hilarious. Now his latest travel memoir, this one about his adventures in Great Britain, are available on Kindle for $1.99 Since I long to live in England with every fiber of my being, I obviously purchased this one. Get Notes From a Small Island for yourself here.

In Praise of Bees by Kristin Gleeson

Currently a bestseller on Amazon, Kristin Gleeson's novel, In Praise of Bees, takes us back to ancient Ireland. We've got memory loss, nuns fighting the patriarchy, and political turmoil. I have to be honest, historical fiction is not usually my thang, but I began reading the book preview on Amazon and couldn't stop, so I made it mine. It's just $0.99 currently -- check it out here.

Passenger by Alexandra Bracken

While I am not usually a huge fan of historical fiction, I am a huge, raving, jumping-up-and-down-excited fan of time travel. Particularly books in which said time travel is more subtle, instead of the #1 main focus. Passenger by Alexandra Bracken is one of these. The main character is a 17 year old violin prodigy with an unknown-to-her power that accidentally lands her back in 1776 in the middle of a sea battle (whoops). Of course in addition to time travel there is mystery and mayhem and nefarious plots. This novel is currently $0.99 for Kindle. Peruse Passenger for yourself here.

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige

Danielle Paige's Dorothy Must Die has been on my to-read list since it came out in 2014. I don't always love the idea of retelling tried-and-true classics, but I couldn't resist this twist on The Wizard of Oz. In Paige's version, the books and film that we know and love exist and are known to the protagonist -- the other girl from Kansas who was swept to Oz by a tornado, only to find that everything is not as she expected. She finds herself in the midst of a revolution, and has to choose between the good and the wicked, the notions of which are turned on their heads. This is the first book in a trilogy and is currently on sale for $1.99. Get it here.

The Walls Around Us by Nova Ren Suma

I've been following Nova Ren on Twitter for years, so was delighted to see that one of her novels, The Walls Around Us, is on sale on Kindle. This novel involves two teenage girls, one in prison and one a ballerina, plus a ghostly third party, and boats a good dose of magical realism and even a bit of horror along with its lyrical language and slowly unraveling mystery. It's currently discounted to $1.99 for Kindle. Check it out here.

That's all I've got for now. Watch the blog for another list next week.

What great Kindle deals have you seen on good books? Share in the comments!

She of the Wild Reads: The Book of SHE by Sara Avant Stover

She of the Wild Reads highlights and reviews books that support women on their journey toward becoming fully authentic, free, and fully alive. Today we'll be checking out The Book of She: Your Heroine's Journey into the Heart of Feminine Power by Sara Avant Stover. Enjoy!

About The Book of SHE

In The Book of SHE: Your Heroine’s Journey into the Heart of Feminine Power (New World Library, October 15, 2015), bestselling author Sara Avant Stover guides women to a powerful new understanding of and appreciation for every aspect of femininity. “Your feminine soul, which I call your SHE, contains your deepest source of personal power, inner wisdom, and authentic expression,” writes Sara. “We spend so much of our lives focusing solely on our material realities, forgetting that we are all carry a spark of the divine within us, that most of us never come to truly know our souls.”

The Book of SHE provides women with a road map for what Sara calls The Heroine’s Journey, which merges psychology and spirituality into a path that leads to psychological wholeness, empowerment, and ultimately, full female realization. While Joseph Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey” was conceived in 1949 with primarily men in mind, Sara’s gender-specific map of the Heroine’s Journey is designed with the unique twists and turns that initiation into empowered womanhood in modern times entails.

The Book of SHE turns the current paradigm for success and empowerment on its head, and reminds women that everything in their outer world is based on the unseen, inner one. “By changing the inner, we change the outer — not the other way around,” writes Sara. “Through relinquishing our chronic busyness, we open up the space to increase our capacity to be present and truly enjoy this precious life.”

Beth's Review

When I was offered the opportunity to read + review The Book of SHE, I jumped at the chance. Not only was it already on my divine/empowered feminine to-read list, but I thought it particularly jived with what we do here at She of the Wild. I'm always looking for more delicious reads on this not-very-well represented subject matter, and Sara's book seemed perfect for my tastes.

Each chapter of The Book of SHE includes:

  • the main text, on topics such as "Becoming a Whole and Holy Heroine" and "Ending the War Within"
  • exercises to help you practice and incorporate Sara's teachings into your real-world life
  • journaling prompts to bring you deeper into your heroine's journey
  • access to supplemental materials on Sara's website, such as audio recordings of the meditations included in the book, which I LOVED -- I always get frustrated when authors include meditations in their books, but don't include an audio version

Sara also describes some of her personal experiences from her own heroine's journey. I always enjoy reading such anecdotal stories, but find that many books swing heavily either toward or away this material. The Book of SHE offers a great balance between the author's life experiences and the inspirational instruction.

I particularly enjoyed how Sara shared some of the feminine archetypes that have showed up in her life -- including Emily Dickinson. Yes, the poet. You know that I swooned over Emily being treated as a divine feminine archetype!

The Book of SHE is easy to read -- but does lead you into some complicated terrain, such as journeying to our personal underworlds and healing our mother wounds (yikes). This is necessary for those women who are seeking to live more awake and more empowered, but it can be very uncomfortable. Thankfully, Sara offers a lot support as you traverse this tricksy terrain.

I felt extremely challenged by much of The Book of SHE -- but in ways that felt healthy and necessary. And I also felt incredibly inspired by Sara's words and excited to see what embracing some of her practices might do for me.

Here are a few of my favorite quotes:

"We are at the point where, as grown women, we recognize the need to stop pushing ourselves forward from a hidden agenda to be loved" (p. 35).
"Our bodies aren't indentured servants here to labor for us until we take our dying breath. They are sacred chalices . . . . Our bodies always tell the truth and hold the information we need to thrive" (p. 43).
". . . every moment of the day can be SHE space, if we allow it to be. When we're nursing the baby, driving on the freeway, and chopping onions, we can be at home in our bodies and alive in our senses. Rather than getting lost in thoughts, we can fully inhabit our lives" (p. 81).
"We need to see the darkness as part of our nature. It's half of the miracle of life -- a safe and holy place -- imbued, like dark chocolate, with bittersweet beauty. We need to remember that all true creativity springs from the darkness. We need to learn to hold sleep, surrender, and uncertainty as profound spiritual practices" (p. 102).

If you'd like to embark upon your own heroine's journey, you can purchase your copy of The Book of SHE HERE . . . or keep reading for a chance to win a free copy!

From the Author

Author Sara Avant Stover shares a little about her vision in writing The Book of SHE here:

The Giveaway is CLOSED. Thanks everybody!

Sara's publicist has generously offered to give one She of the Wild reader a free copy of The Book of SHE (!!!).

To enter to win your free copy, fill out the form below and click "enter" by Wednesday, March 10,  and you're good to go!

*Please note: a winner residing outside of the United States will win a digital copy; a domestic winner may choose to receive a print or digital copy.

And! If you'd like to earn extra entries, share this post on your favorite social media outlets, then come back here and leave a comment saying that you did so.

Best of luck, wild ones!

*This post contains affiliate links. I only endorse products I truly believe in. Thanks for support independent authors + artists!

Delicious Words: The Best of Books Devoured in 2014


I love reading.  L O V E reading.  Books have sustained me through some of the hardest challenges of my life.  They are inspiration, education, and sanctuary.  They challenge and uproot.  They uplift my whole person.

That said . . . I've been rather lax in my reading.  Part of it is that being a mama takes up a lot of time (in an awesome way), but then after my sweet boy goes to bed, it's honestly easier to take in some TV shows on Amazon Prime than it is to pick up a book.

Still, my goal was to read ten books in 2014 (I know, I know, such a small goal for a woman who professes to L O V E reading), and I exceeded that.  So yay me.  And also yay to the fact that reading, even what feels like a paltry amount, has reminded me of just how much I need to be reading.  Not just because it is awesome and good for your brain and nourishing to me on a personal level, but also as a writer.  If I want to be a professional writer, I need to be a professional reader, too.

Here are some of my [highly professional?] favorite reads of 2014.


Non-fiction

The Dance of the Dissident Daughter by Sue Monk Kidd.  This was my first read of the year, and oh man, was it a good one -- and kind of perfect that it was my premiere book of 2014.  It's an autobiographical account of author Kidd's journey out of patriarchy and into her own self.  Perfect for any woman seeking to embrace her own woman-ness in a deeper way.

“I often went to Catholic mass or Eucharist at the Episcopal church, nourished by the symbol and power of this profound feeding ritual. It never occurred to me how odd it was that women, who have presided over the domain of food and feeding for thousands of years, were historically and routinely barred from presiding over it in a spiritual context. And when the priest held out the host and said, "This is my body, given for you," not once did I recognize that it is women in the act of breastfeeding who most truly embody those words and who are also most excluded from ritually saying them.” 

- from The Dance of the Dissident Daughter


Immortal Diamond: The Search For Our True Self by Richard Rohr.  If you follow me on social media, you may already know that I read a good deal of Rohr's works this year.  I even started a free book on Facebook for other Rohr readers.  So I probably don't have to tell you that I really (really, really) like what Rohr has to say.  Reading this Franciscan's priest's words helped move me from seeing the world, and specifically matters of spirituality and faith, in black and white (otherwise known as dualism) to opening up to a greater and more mysterious spectrum of existence and possibility.  Read it if you're weary of spiritual shoulds and are looking for another way.  I also recommend The Naked Now, Job and the Mystery of Suffering, The Enneagram: A Christian Perspective, and Falling Upward, all by Rohr and all among my 2014 reads.

“Metaphor is the only possible language available to religion because it alone is honest about Mystery.” 

- from Immortal Diamond


Red, Hot, and Holy: A Heretic's Love Story by Sera Beak.  I have something of a love/hate relationship with this book.  I felt like the book's description made promises that the book itself did not deliver on.  However, I have to put it on this list anyway because I love how committed Beak is to finding her whole self, no matter the cost.  Don't read this is a self-help book (that's what messed me up, I think -- read her The Red Book if that's what you need) but as an autobiographical love story between one woman and her Holy.

“Ideas aren’t helping you anymore, Sera. Concepts have run their course. Paradigms pop. Theories leak. Techniques are only top-offs. Beliefs brush away. Books close. Workshops end. What truly transforms is this Closeness with Me. You gotta hug Me so tight that nothing comes between Us.” 

- from Red, Hot, and Holy


Women Who Run With the Wolves by Clarissa Pinkola Estes.  I haven't finished this yet, despite having started it at the end of 2013.  It's not the kind of book you can rush through.  I find it hard to read more than a few pages at a time, because it is rich and healing and alive.  It is a collection of retold myths and fairytales.  Required reading for the awakening woman.

“If you have yet to be called an incorrigable, defiant woman, don't worry, there is still time.” 

- from Women Who Run With the Wolves

Fiction

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.  This book.  This book.  It is perhaps the best book I read this year.  It is a work of art, leaving me breathless like few works of fiction ever have.  It is hard, and lovely, and challenging, and sacred.  Go.  Read it.  Now.  I'll wait.  (And read Ness's other works afterward, because those are really quite good, too.)

Stories are wild creatures, the monster said. When you let them loose, who knows what havoc they might wreak?” 

- from A Monster Calls


The Grisha Trilogy by Leigh Bardugo.  This trilogy isn't high art like Ness's book.  But it is really, really fun.  And it's set in a fantasy world based loosely in Russian culture, which I found unique and refreshing.  The story can be a little predictable, but Bardugo makes up for that with lots of engaging adventure, bloodshed, characters that you care about (pirates!!!!), and romance that I didn't hate.  Like I said,  I had a blast reading these, and couldn't stop until I'd consumed all three back to back to back.

“Anything worth doing always starts as a bad idea.” 

- from Siege and Storm, book 2 of the Grisha Trilogy


His Fair Assassin Trilogy by Robin Lafevers.  I started this series in 2013, but the final book only released this November.  I have been practically panting for it all year, and per-ordered it so I'd get it on release day -- I never pre-order books.  I basically love this trilogy with all my heart.  It's about assassin nuns (assassin nuns, people!!!) set in medieval Burgundy.  Snarky, deliciously dark at times, full of ass-kicking women, they are SO GOOD. 

“I comfort myself with the knowledge that if Duval ever feels smothered by me, it will be because I am holding a pillow over his face.” 

- from Grave Mercy, book 1 of the His Fair Assassin Trilogy


Magdalen Rising by Elizabeth Cunningham.  This book is the first in The Maeve Chronicles, a series retelling the story of Mary Magdalen.  Under Cunningham's care, Mary becomes the fierce and fiery Celtic (eeek!) Maeve, who is raised by seven mothers and goes off for training under the Druids once she comes of age.  Trigger warning: there is sexual violence which, while not explicit, is nonetheless devastating.  Honestly, although it took me awhile to come around to it, this is one of the reasons I love this book.  It's the best fictional representation of sexual violence I've seen because, as with true life sex crimes, it completely stops and reroutes the story.  Nothing is the same after this intimate shattering.  I'm looking forward to reading the remaining books in the series.

“I've outgrown my childhood name, and I haven't found a new one yet.”

- from Magdalen Rising
Poetry

Rilke's Book of Hours: Love Poems to God by Rainer Maria Rilke.  No best-of-books list would be complete without poetry.  And Rilke's poetry is so, so rich.  It is just what I needed to read: the words of a mystic, questioning, reaching into the darkness, and learning to be satisfied with not-knowing.  Rilke's poetry echoes my own heart's throbbing.

“I circle around God, that primordial tower. / I have been circling for thousands of years, / And I still don't know: am I a falcon, / A storm, or a great song?” 

- from Rilke's Book of Hours


The Anatomy of Being by Shinji Moon.  I'm still working my way through this collection of poetry, but it is powerful.  Visceral, electric, and full of emotion.  And I love that Moon independently published it.  Basically, yum.

“You will lie to everyone you love. / They will love you anyways.” 

- from The Anatomy of Being

Friends' books

This list would not be complete without mentioning the bravery of my friends who published books in 2014.  I've blogged about a couple, but here they are in their totality, all gorgeous and worth reading(I feel pretty sure I'm forgetting someone . . . if so, my deepest apologies! pregnancy brain strikes again -- remind me and I will happily add yours to the list!)

For 2015 . . .

I've already started reading some of the books that will become my best-books-of-2015 list, I can just feel it.  Like A Discovery of Witches, for example, which I'm currently devouring.  I'd like to read more fiction across a variety of genres, styles, and topics, both for fun and for my edification as a writer.  I tend toward reading a lot of more self-help-y kind of books (usually spiritual ones), particularly when I feel like my heart is spinning.  So more fiction for 2015.

I'd also like to read more parenting books.  I've bought a decent bunch of them over the past two years, and have barely touched them.  I'd like to finish one or two.

Similar to my accumulation of parenting books, I've accumulated even more books on writing over the years -- and again haven't read most of them.  So I'm planning on reading more of those, particularly Writing Begins With the Breath because, well, writing tends to bring out the worst of my neuroses, so writing + breathing sounds like a better plan than writing + emotional eating, or writing + floundering in self-doubt, or writing + depression.

Looking back over this list, I notice that the authors mentioned are predominantly white.  This isn't necessarily a bad thing, but it is curious.  I'd like to widen my range of authors, to take in the experiences of those who don't look like me.  I think it's important, as a person and as a writer.  I've already started doing this with my son's books, expanding our picture book collection with stories featuring non-white characters and both male and female main characters, as well as purchasing toys that aren't all male, or the kind of toys marketed only for males.  It's time to challenge myself and expand my mind in some of the same ways as I'm doing for my son.  One book I'm particularly looking forward to/nervous about reading is Writing the Other, which delves into penning characters of a different ethnicity than the author.

And more poetry.  Because poetry = awesome.

On top of that, a number of my friends are publishing new books in 2015, so I'm also looking forward to getting my hands on those.

Most of all, though -- I've purchased a TON of books I haven't read yet in the last year or two.  So my main book goals for 2015 are to a) read a bunch, and b) buy no more books!  (Anyone else have a book buying problem?)

I'm also having a baby in the spring if all goes well, so I'm setting these book (and all 2015) goals with fluidity and grace.  Who knows how much time I'll have to read/create/brush my teeth in the second half of the year, so I'm holding everything quite loosely (or trying to). 

Okay, enough from me.  Your turn!  What were some of your favorite reads of 2014?  Anyone with me in the assassin nun fangirling?  How about your reading hopes for the new year?


*this post contains affiliate links. thanks for support the blog!

Somewhere Between Water and Sky {A Book Launch + Giveaway!}

I heard it said once that every human is a story with skin.

If this is true, paragraphs would be etched in the scars on my wrists.

Whole chapters could be written about the way my heart pounds when I startle awake.

And every single one of my tears could fill a book.

But stories, with all their promise, only leave room for disappointment. I don’t have room for that anymore. I left it all—the hope, the love, the promise—back in my old life with the ghosts I’d rather forget: Jude. Emma. Pacey.

Kevin.

This is how I dare to move forward and to believe in a new beginning. I let go of the old. I just grab the new and run. I don’t wait around anymore. I can’t.

Waiting leaves room for the voices.

Somewhere between water and sky, I'll find a way to burn these voices to the ground.


Writing a book is really hard.  Like, really hard.  The combination of blind hope, precision, and sheer guts that it takes to not only write but release a book is insane, and awesome, and calls up all sorts of exhilaration and terror (the good kind) within me.

So when someone I know does it, launches a book out into this wide world, I'm going to say something.  And today, Elora Ramirez releases her latest book, Somewhere Between Water and Sky (that's what the above gorgeous words are from).  This is the sequel to her premiere novel which came out last year, which I also highly recommend.  I haven't gotten to read SBWaS yet, but I'm looking forward to it.  I know Elora from her online writing community, The Story Unfolding, and without her and the wonderful women I met there, my own book would never have happened.  So . . . thank you, and congrats, Elora!

And -- Elora is giving away a coaching session and an Amazon giftcard!  You can enter here, and following are links to where you can purchase a copy (psst: it's $0.99 on Kindle!), and to more of Elora's creations.

Grab a copy:

Elora Ramirez lives in Austin, Texas with her chef-husband. At the age of four, she taught herself how to read and write, cutting her teeth on books like Dr. Seuss and writing anywhere she could find the space--including her Fisher Price kitchen set, the pages of picture books and Highlights Magazine. Since then, she's grown to love the way words feel as they swell within her bones. Writing holy and broken is her calling, and pushing back the darkness and pursuing beauty through story is her purpose. She embraces the power of story and teaches women from all parts of the world how to embrace theirs. She has a knack of calling things out , the truth and the detail, the subversive threads that make a life a story. She loves hip-hop, wishes she lived by the beach and cannot write without copious amounts of coffee, chocolate, music, and her husband's lavender liqueur. 


http://www.amazon.com/Somewhere-Between-Water-Elora-Ramirez-ebook/dp/B00MR3Z62A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1410403770&sr=8-1&keywords=Somewhere+Between+Water+and+Sky